Super Bowl Meh

A friend of mine and I have had the tradition over the past decade plus to text one another throughout the Super Bowl on the status of the ads, the game, the halftime and in turn, America.

Sometimes there have been exceptional moments to share  and to be a part of the collective experience that is the unofficial holiday of Super Bowl.

The game’s quality aside, throughout this year’s broadcast was “meh.” We found ourselves grasping for some semblance of an ad, a message, a theme that would resonate beyond this morning’s news blurbs on local tv… and there just wasn’t any to speak of.

The trailers for movies were just about the same trailers as we’ve seen for the last umpteen years. Autos seemed off message. Messaging about Marilyn Monroe seemed to be as disconnected with the millennial generation, just as a block of what one could only assume was millennially-focused spots mid- second quarter that fell flat with older demos. Enough with the computer generated or enhanced animals. We’ve seen enough.

While a certain level of creativity was present in many ads – kind of like a spark of an idea – but none of them have me running to YouTube to watch and share this morning, (which I keep reading is the value-add of spending $5 million for thirty seconds of time.)

Buzz Unworthy.

What I really miss is the emotional, smart, thought-provoking cleverness that used to permeate the advertising industry. What I fear is that the combination of the Trump effect (mean spirited, Tweet driven, lowest common denominator messaging) and the reliance upon metadata to make deciions  has extinguished the flame that created messaging that resonated.

As a proponent of arts marketing – and in turn arts advertising everywhere – I will continue to stand on my soapbox and preach the virtues of quality content and efficient messaging to a world starved of meaningful engagement.

Either that or we just need a new Apple product launch.

About

Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for 25 years. Currently, Sean is a principal in the Aspire Consulting Group providing solutions and training for arts, events and non-profit marketing professionals and their organizations. Clients include Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) and a growing list of satisfied organizations. Sean speaks regularly throughout the U.S. including at the IFEA Annual Conference, Arts Reach Conference, AFP, 92Y, CiviCRM User Summit, PA Council on the Arts, Michigan Festivals & Event Annual Conference. Sean serves as the Marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street, a program of the Allentown Chamber of Commerce in Allentown and is a Co-Chair of the Arts & Culture Committee for the Upside Allentown initiative. You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire or email him anytime at sking.aspire@gmail.com

Posted in Brand, Content Marketing, Creativity, Marketing

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About Sean King
Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for 25 years.  Currently, Sean is a principle in the Aspire Consulting Group providing solutions and training for arts, events and non-profit marketing professionals and their organizations. Clients include Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) and a growing list of satisfied organizations. Sean speaks regularly throughout the United States including at the IFEA Annual Conference, Arts Reach Conference, AFP, 92Y, CiviCRM User Summit, PA Council on the Arts, Michigan Festivals & Event Annual Conference.  Sean serves as the Marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street program in Allentown and is a Co-Chair of the Arts & Culture Committee for the Upside Allentown initiative. He also blogs a artsmarketingblog.org.  You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire. Sean resides with his wife Natalie and son Haydn in the global crossroads of Fogelsville, Pa.