March is Collaboration Month

March is not necessarily collaboration month as decreed by the government or church – or any other entity. But in celebration of a month where a good deal of my writing, research and work has been in the spirit of collaboration, I thought it appropriate to make March “our” official month collaboration.

I’m honored to have been invited to write and speak through the Arts Reach organization on the topic of collaboration this month. First, a companion article entitled 1+1=3 The Power of Collaboration was published in their quarterly magazine and later this week I will be speaking at the New York Conference at NYU. Hope to see you there.

In the spirit of all of this collaboration, I wanted to share components of the article first published in Arts Reach earlier this month.

We have been working here in Allentown on some collaborative arts marketing initiatives starting with a cooperative event and then the #GivingTuesday collaborative fundraiser. Next on the list are additional marketing and sustainability objectives which we believe we can achieve through working together.

The theme of all of my writings has been If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

Over the next few days, I’ll share some of the elements we found that work particularly well when it comes to collaborating on any level.

For our first installment, every successful collaboration begins with a Catalyst.

A Catalyst – Every great project needs a catalyst. The catalyst is the one person or one event that gets everyone off of zero and initiates the momentum. Without the catalyst, there’s generally not much appetite for doing something new. In most cases, this impetus will come from outside the participating organizations, but rather emanate from a political or business leader, foundation, donor or an important anniversary, opening or other major community celebration. Keep your eyes open for an opportunity to leverage a catalyst to launch your collaboration.

Stay tuned for another component to be explored each day this week!

About

Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for 25 years. Currently, Sean is a principal in the Aspire Consulting Group providing solutions and training for arts, events and non-profit marketing professionals and their organizations. Clients include Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) and a growing list of satisfied organizations. Sean speaks regularly throughout the U.S. including at the IFEA Annual Conference, Arts Reach Conference, AFP, 92Y, CiviCRM User Summit, PA Council on the Arts, Michigan Festivals & Event Annual Conference. Sean serves as the Marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street, a program of the Allentown Chamber of Commerce in Allentown and is a Co-Chair of the Arts & Culture Committee for the Upside Allentown initiative. You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire or email him anytime at sking.aspire@gmail.com

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About Sean King
Sean King has been consulting with small businesses and non-profit organizations for 25 years.  Currently, Sean is a principle in the Aspire Consulting Group providing solutions and training for arts, events and non-profit marketing professionals and their organizations. Clients include Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) and a growing list of satisfied organizations. Sean speaks regularly throughout the United States including at the IFEA Annual Conference, Arts Reach Conference, AFP, 92Y, CiviCRM User Summit, PA Council on the Arts, Michigan Festivals & Event Annual Conference.  Sean serves as the Marketing Chairperson for the Hamilton District Main Street program in Allentown and is a Co-Chair of the Arts & Culture Committee for the Upside Allentown initiative. He also blogs a artsmarketingblog.org.  You can follow Sean on Twitter @skingaspire. Sean resides with his wife Natalie and son Haydn in the global crossroads of Fogelsville, Pa.